Awning Repair


This happens to be a common question.  My awning tore off and my awning bag is destroyed.

There really isn't anything special about camper bag awning that make you go to the RV repair shop to get them fixed.  Most common the bag is either aged out (broken zipper or seams tearing out) or damaged somehow.  Well I believe you can get it fixed for a reasonable cost by a local specialist.  Now I say specialist but I don't mean an awning specialist, but a sewing specialist.  Not really surprising is the fact that your awning and bag are just all weather materials sewn together.  So if a seam ripped you can actually just bring it to a seamstress to fix it.  I know everyone is thinking it is an awning not a shirt, but stay with me thinking outside the box.  You will be surprised to see who can actually fix it and at what cost.  Places to search for repairs are; Marine repair, boat covers, canvas repair, truck repair, automotive interior repair, upholstery repair and of course your local seamstress.
          
I just read this in my normal forum reading and thought of this page.
  "My Coleman has a small 8 ft awning that the bag was destroyed. I didn't want to get a new awning cause I have a screen room that is made for the original awning. So I took it to my local marine upholstery shop.  I'm having a new bag made from awning grade Sunbrella (taupe color), new heavy duty zipper and  new awning welting/rope (the rubber that slides in the track).  Everything was 100 bucks.  I should have it this week."

Your local specialist may not have the parts, but don't worry.  You can find all of the parts online to be shipped to you at reasonable costs. 
Most parts are easy to find.  You may only have to replace a simple $1.20 zipper pull to get it back up and running or maybe just sew a new zipper in.  This material is not much harder to sew than denim.  They do use heavy duty machines that use longer stitches, but once you call around you will find a bunch of help.
I suggest sailboat suppliers.  My favorite is http://www.sailrite.com/  They have a wide variety of materials and hardware to fix your awning.  Actually, they are a great source for a lot of camper materials.  Curtain hangers, those little buttons on the poles that keep them extended, materials for screens.  Check it out for your next project.
http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/YKK-Continuous-Vislon-Zipper-Chain-White-10_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000


Should I just buy a new bag instead of having mine fixed?  I wouldn't.  Even if you find the replacement bag you will still need a specialist to sew your old awning into the new bag.  I would suggest finding someone who can sew the awning in and get a price from them to make the whole new bag.

Basic parts of an awning.
Frame (Legs and rail) - Very specialized and probably best to go to the manufacturer to get replacements.
Material - Common material that you can order in the color you want and quality.  I think Sunbrella is very popular.  Outdoor-Living-Fabric/Awning-and-Shade-Fabric


Camper AttachmentAwning track is what it is called.  You can replace your broken or add a new one.  The attachment to your camper varies depending on your roof materials.
http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/Awning-Track-Aluminum-96_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/Flex-A-Rail-White-90_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/Awning-Track-Flanged-White-96_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000

Awning attachmentAwning rope is what this is called.  Some people call it welt, but I think that is not the correct material.  The awning rope is easy to attach and replace your broken rope.
http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/Awning-Rope-Vinyl-3-8_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000
http://www.sailrite.com/Product%20Images/Awning-Rope-Black-Vinyl_1.jpg?resizeid=6&resizeh=1000&resizew=1000









Awning Legs and their Feet
This drive me nuts when I got my first camper.  I would set up the awing and the legs would dig in the ground.  The little caps were missing from the bottom.  I was able to find new round inserts (called furniture inserts) to replace the missing ones.  But, every time I put my awning away they seemed to get knocked out by the legs in the storage position.  To solve this I drilled in the side of the leg into the insert and installed a small rivet.  Easy fix and now the inserts stay inserted.